The importance of Bees

Bees are disappearing globally at an alarming rate due to pesticides, parasites, disease and habitat loss. If these little insects that help provide so much of the food we eat were to vanish, what would we do without them?
Contact Us 1

The importance of Bees

Ever wondered where all the food that you eat comes from? It might surprise you that a significant proportion is provided by bees one way or another.

Save the bees

If you look at the plate of food on your dinner table, bees have played their part either pollinating the many vegetables and fruits we eat directly or pollinating the food for the animals that we then consume. And that’s not all bees do for us – honey and wax are two other important products that come courtesy of bees.

But honey bees are disappearing globally at an alarming rate due to pesticides, parasites, disease and habitat loss. If these little insects that help provide so much of the food we eat were to vanish, what would we do without them?

What bees do for us

An illustration of what all honey bees, and a colony of honey bees, do for us in the UK each year. However, pollination is from all invertebrates, of which honey bees are a significant contributor.

Pollination and food production

All sorts of fruit and vegetables are pollinated by honey bees, such as broccoli and squash, apples and almonds.

Pollination is not just important for the food we eat directly, it’s vital for the foraging crops, such as field beans and clover, used to feed the livestock we depend on for meat. Just as importantly, it helps to feed many other animals in the food chain and maintains the genetic diversity of the flowering plant

Credit BBC

What threats are there to UK bees?

  • The use of pesticides
  • Loss of Habitat
  • Diseases
  • Extreme Weather
  • Competition from invasive species

 What can we do to help?

  • Grow more flowers, shrubs and trees
  • Don’t cut the grass so often
  • Create a wild garden or wildflower meadow
  • Try not to use pesticides
  • Don’t disturb natural habitats
  • Create habitats

Alan Titchmarsh shows you what to plant in your garden to encourage bees.

Do your bit for the planet and become a beekeeper…..it’s easier than you might think!

There are several Beekeeper groups in Brightwater.

Many who provide training, information and regular workshops/talks. Here are just some of our local Beekeepers:

Darlington Beekeepers Association 

Aycliffe Bees

If you’re not local to the Brightwater patch, find your nearest group here

WIN A BEEKEEPING COURSE 

FOR YOU AND A FRIEND! 

Visit our social pages on #WorldBeeDay to enter!
 
(20th May 2021)
Aycliffe Beekeeping Course 10th and 11th July. 
 
The course will roughly run from 10am-4pm on both days, but weather permitting on the Sunday afternoon
 
BEE 2
Participants will go to the training apiary for some practical experience.
 
The venue is yet to be confirmed, but it will be within the Newton Aycliffe area.
 
The course covers
 
  • History of beekeeping
  • the various components of a hive
  • The lifecycle of bees
  • Pests and diseases
  • Swarm control and education.  
 
On completion, you will be competent enough to start keeping bees in your own hive, with the support of the Aycliffe Association Beekeepers.  
 
Friend membership also included 

Share this

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on whatsapp

Brightwater News

BE PART OF SOMETHING
PRETTY AMAZING

Get in touch with us today to receive updates about the Discover Brightwater programme and information on opportunities to get involved…
JUST ENTER YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS BELOW AND FIRE IT AWAY…

  • Name
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Global Footer 1
Global Footer

Bright Water Landscape
Partnership, Unit 28 Durham Way South, Newton Aycliffe, DL5 6XP

info@discoverbrightwater.co.uk


Privacy Policy | Terms & Conditions

Copyright © 2018–2021 Discover Brightwater

Web Design by LemonTop