Barmpton and Little Ketton Walk

Along grassy paths and river banks, through farmland with stocked fields. Some steep inclines and muddy surfaces in bad weather conditions. Barriers include stiles, kissing gates and narrow footbridges.
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HERE'S YOUR FREE ADVENTURE GUIDE

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What to expect from the walk:

Along grassy paths and river banks, through farmland with stocked fields. Some steep inclines and muddy surfaces in bad weather conditions. Barriers include stiles, kissing gates and narrow footbridges.

Distance: 5.7km / 3.5 Miles

Postcode: DL1 3JG (nearest)

Grid Ref: NZ 31617 17928

Turn left off Whinfield Road (A1150) near Asda, onto Whinbush Way.Turn left onto Barmpton Lane in 950m.

POINTS OF INTEREST ALONG THIS WALK

Skerne

The River Skerne

This stretch of the Skerne has recently been improved by funding from National Lottery Heritage Funds by managing vegetation growth and narrowing the channel, by laying bundles birch tree “brash”, where it has been over widened.

The improvements allow better connected habitat for fish and the brash bundles provide ideal habitat for invertebrates and fry of species such as trout and chub. Click the image above to follow our journey along The ‘Skerne

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Ketton

Home to famous Colling brothers Charles and Robert – who was also know as ‘The Prince of the Skerne’.

Their family had farmed the Skerne valley to the north of Darlington for generations. Robert, born in 1749, farmed at Barmpton, and Charles, born in 1750, farmed at Ketton Hall. They bought the best local beasts and interbred them, and after about 15 years of experimentation, the Ketton Ox was born in March 1796. Because of its enormity, when it was first exhibited on Darlington market in 1799, it caused a great stir.
You can find out more by clicking the image above

BARMPTON AND LITTLE KETTON

Packhorse Bridge

Built in the late 17th and would have provided a crossing point over the Skerne for pack animals, now standing some 70m from the Skerne itself, shows the reengineering that has taken place to alter the Skerne, to provide more water power to the mills downstream.

The name Salter’s Lane, gives a clue to the use of the route – the route connected salt pans along the north east coast to market town in the area. Click the image above to Discover more about our unique and rich heritage.

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